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FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

We have tried to answer the most frequently asked questions about Mata Hinglaj. If you have a question which is not featured here, please feel free to contact us.

Hinglaj Mata is said to be very powerful deity who bestows good to all her devotees. While Hinglaj is her main temple, temples dedicated to her exist in neighbouring Indian states Gujarat and Rajasthan. The shrine is known as Hingula, Hingalaja, Hinglaja, and Hingulata in Hindu scriptures, particularly in Sanskrit. The goddess is known as Hinglaj Mata (the Mother Hinglaj), Hinglaj Devi (the Goddess Hinglaj), Hingula Devi (the red goddess or the Goddess of Hingula) and Kottari or Kotavi. The chief legend of Hinglaj Mata relates to the creation of the Shakti Peethas The temple is located in Hinglaj, a town on the Makran coast in the Lasbela district of Balochistan, and is the middle of the Hingol National Park. It is one of the 51 Shakti Peethas in Shaktism denomination of Hinduism. It is one of the two Shakti Peethas in Pakistan, other being Shivaharkaray. It is a form of Durga or Devi in a mountain cavern on the banks of the Hingol River.

The temple of Hinglaj Mata, a Hindu goddess, is situated in Lasbela district of Balochistan, and in the middle of the Hingol National Park.

The Temple is located in the Lasbela District of Balochistan, Pakistan. The nearest airport is Karachi. It is about 170 miles(250 KM) from Karachi city. From Karachi on has to take the "Karachi - Quetta" Highway upto 'Zero Point' (75 miles) and then head west through Lyari town to signal Fauji Camp Stop, crossing Aghore River and Goongi River and finally arriving at "Asha Pura".

According to legend, Lord Brahma had performed a yagna (Vedic ritual of fire sacrifice) to please Shakti and Shiva to aid in the creation of the universe. As a result, Goddess Shakti separated from Shiva and emerged to help Brahma. Once her purpose was fulfilled, Shakti had to be returned to Shiva. In time, Brahma's son Daksha performed several yajnas to obtain Shakti as his daughter in the form of Sati, with the motive of marrying her to Shiva.

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Sati, Sanskrit Satī (“Virtuous Woman”), in Hinduism, one of the wives of the god Shiva and a daughter of the sage Daksa. When her father failed to invite her husband to a great sacrifice, Sati died of mortification and was later reborn as the goddess Parvati.

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Ambaji, 185km from Ahmedabad, is a temple city that attracts millions of worshippers each year. Legend has it that the heart of Shiva's consort Sati fell here. This makes it one of the 51 Shakti Peethas and therefore a key pilgrimage centre.

It was not Shiva but Vishnu, who cut the body of Sati into peices.

Enraged at the insult and death of his spouse and immersed in grief, Shiva picked up the remains of Sati's body and performed the Tandava, the celestial dance of destruction, across all creation. Frightened, the other Gods requested Vishnu to intervene to stop this destruction. As a recourse, Vishnu used the Sudarshana Chakra on Sati's corpse dismembering the body of Sati into 108 parts, from which 51 fell on earth and others on other planets in the universe which became Shakti Peethas, temple to a form of the Goddess.

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The practice of Shaktism, although predominantly rooted in, but no longer confined to India, as traditional Shakta temples have sprung up across Southeast Asia, the Americas, Europe, Australia and elsewhere, most of them enthusiastically attended by diasporic Hindus and non-Indians alike.

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While the major Hindu sects focus on bhakti to gods in the trimurti, Shaktism focuses on worship of the ''Great Goddess'' and her many forms.

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Shakti is the personification of the energy that is creative, sustaining, as well as destructive, sometimes referred to as auspicious source energy. As the Shakti or Creatrix, she is known as "Adi Shakti" or "Adi Para Shakti"

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Shaktism may be monotheistic, with one goddess understood as the origin of all other goddesses, or it may be polytheistic, with many goddesses who exist equally. While Shaktism is most often found in Hinduism, it sometimes refers to the worship of goddesses in the Buddhist and Jain traditions of South Asia.

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Based upon textual evidence, it is believed to have been composed in South India not earlier than the 9th or later than the 11th century CE.

The Kaula or Kaulachara, first appeared as a coherent ritual system in the 8th century in central India, and its most revered theorist is the 18th-century philosopher Bhaskararaya, widely considered "the best exponent of Shakta philosophy.

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Shaktas are the worshipers of the goddess, called Shakti or Devi, in India. mostly Hindu Bengalis are Shaktas which means the devotees of Maa Durga and her other forms. Shaktism is, together with Vaishnavism and Shaivism, one of the major forms of modern Hinduism and is especially popular in Bengal and Assam.

It is believed that Adi Shakti, the primordial power behind the universe, takes birth as Parvati. Recognising this connection, Parvati is known as Adi Shakti. According to Hindu mythology, Adi Para Shakti—the Goddess or Devi—is the Supreme Being who is recognised as Para Brahman

During Navaratra, each of her forms is propitiated, one after another, by devotees at home or in temples, who observe fast or vigils, do kumari-puja, 'virgin-adoration', recite mantras, or worship yantras - geometrical representations, appropriate to the deity.

Baba Keenaram was an Aghori ascetic born in Chandauli, India. Keenaram is believed to be the originator of the Aghori sect by some sources, however the sect has been mentioned in several ancient Hindu relegious texts. He was considered to be the incarnation of Lord Shiva.

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The Aghoris are devotees of Lord Shiva manifested as Lord Bhairava. The Aghoris are monists (concept of singleness) who seek moksha (liberation) from the cycle of samsara (reincarnation).

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Aghori practice healing through purification as a pillar of their ritual. Their patients believe the Aghoris are able to transfer health to, and pollution away from patients as a form of "transformative healing", due to the believed superior state of body and mind of the Aghori.Real Aghori sadhus don't have Supernatural powers. They live a simple life devoted to lord Shiva. For them the whole creation is supernatural.

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Aghoris are devotees of Shiva manifested as Bhairava, and monists who seek moksha from the cycle of reincarnation or saṃsāra.

Aghoris base their beliefs on two principles common to broader Shaiva beliefs, that Lord Shiva is perfect (having omniscience, omnipresence and omnipotence) and that Lord Shiva is responsible for everything that occurs – all conditions, causes and effects.

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